Category: Announcements

2nd call for applications: BIEA Thematic Research Grants

Every year the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) invites applications for our small Thematic Research Grants. These funds are usually dispersed through two calls for applications per year. This is the second call for applications in the 2021/22 year. Please pay attention to this webpage in April 2022 for the first 2022/23 grant call deadline information.

The British Institute in Eastern Africa invites applications for funding for research projects that engage with one or more of the following thematic areas:

  1. Epidemics, pandemics and epizootics
  2. Citizens and science
  3. Knowing environments
  4. Technologies of politics
  5. Urban lives
  6. Retelling the past

For further details see: https://www.biea.ac.uk/research/biea-research-themes/.

BIEA research funding is available to support original research within these thematic areas in any discipline in the humanities and social sciences across the region. The BIEA’s thematic grant scheme particularly seeks to help researchers who have limited access to other sources of funds. In doing so, the BIEA seeks to nurture early career researchers and scholars in eastern Africa, and is keen to fund small projects that lay the ground for larger projects.  Such researchers may include postgraduate students in eastern African or the UK, or people who have not followed conventional research careers but whose local knowledge or contacts make them well-fitted to conduct high quality research. We particularly encourage applications from the wider eastern African region, which we define as stretching from Sudan, to Mozambique, and including Madagascar. 

Grants are normally between £500 and £1,000; in exceptional circumstances, up to £1,500 may be awarded. The grant should contribute towards actual research costs and not include institutional overheads, equipment, and applicant’s stipend or publication costs. Priority is given to researchers based in the UK or eastern Africa.

The application form with details of supporting documents required can be downloaded here.

All applications and references must be submitted by email to  [email protected]  by Monday the 15 of November 2021. Please note that late applications will not be considered. 

Successful applicants will be notified in early December 2021.  If you have not heard from us by then, please consider your application not successful this time.

Anthropology, AI and the Future of Human Society

Virtual Conference 6 -10 June 2022

Call for Panels Deadline: 4 November 2021

Proposals for panels are invited for the virtual conference Anthropology, AI and the Future of Human Society. AI has come to represent multiple causal drivers of change: amongst them artificial intelligence itself, space exploration, bio-tech and other emerging technologies. The implications for human society could hardly be more significant, and feed into a host of already contemporary concerns, such as sovereignty, economics, politics, reproduction and kinships, ethics and law, conflict and many more.

We wish to explore these issues from the broadest range of perspectives. From its foundation, anthropology has studied the complexity and variety of human society, and now we may turn to developing a sustained body of disciplinary understanding envisaging what may come in near, and more distant eras. There has been systematic consideration already in many other fields, whether within or outside academia. We would therefore invite interested proposals from anthropologists of any background, and also those who would like to think about their work in conjunction with anthropology, or hold a dialogue with anthropologists. The arts as well as the sciences are invited, for this is an area of human speculation where both have made very great contributions, and we see the different approaches as being mutually stimulating.

Without in any way wishing to limit the possibilities, we suggest below a few of the potential areas of interest:

  • Visions of the future: scientific and artistic imaginations
  • Ethics, law and governance
  • Biotechnology: DNA and reproduction
  • Consciousness and the machine/biological interface
  • Future conflicts and the military
  • Economics, the digital future and the creation of value
  • Inequality, sovereignty and demography
  • Climate change and the environment
  • Science fiction and its place in futures studies
  • Agronomics and ecology
  • Information, democracy and politics
  • Robots and sociality, and human/machine interaction
  • AI and human Identities
  • Space exploration and extra-terrestrial migration
  • Disciplinary reflections: anthropological attempts to anticipate the future

Panel proposals should be made please by 4 November 2021 and may be made here.

Call for Panels opens 13 July 2021 and closes on 4 November 2021

Call for Papers opens 6 December 2021 and closes on 25 February 2022

Registration opens 11 April 2022

Conference Fees:

RAI Fellows & Members: £90
Non-Fellows: £150
Concessions (students, unemployed and retired persons): £45
Delegates with low income from Low Income Countries (https://g2lm-lic.iza.org/call-phase-iv/list-of-lic/): £30

15th International Conference for Nubian Studies University of Warsaw 29th August – 4th September 2022

Dear Friends and Colleagues,
We are very sorry for the late communication. The pandemic delayed a lot of decision-making processes in Poland, and we had to wait longer than expected for the results of our funding applications, as well as for the full re-opening of the accommodation base and event management businesses to provide you with information that is both reliable and
accurate.
Conference fees
While we received the funding decisions eventually, there are still many uncertainties regarding the accommodation. We are happy to announce that we were able to keep the conference fee on the level of the previous one, i.e. 120 euros for scholars, with a reduced fee for students (pre-PhD) at 75 euros. Participants from Sudan and Egypt are exempted from payment.

Accommodation
You can find the list of accommodation offers under this link http://bwz.uw.edu.pl/zakwaterowanie-w-warszawie/. It includes venues where the conference participants can get discounted rates, but most of them are not yet booking for summer 2022 and will presumably start doing so in September 2021. Please be patient, we will update accommodation
information as soon as it becomes available. You may also search Airbnb or Booking.com websites. They have a great selection of various flats and rooms for rent.

Conference Programme: Call for Session Themes
After discussion with the Board of our Society, we have decided to arrange the programme of the conference around themed sessions (see the suggested sessions in attachment and on the 15th ICNS website: https://nubianstudies2022.uw.edu.pl/main-sessions/). Since this is a novelty, and because we would like the conference to be more participatory in terms of programme creation, we would like to invite participants to set up their sessions, too. This will be a two-step process: At this point, we announce the call for sessions with a deadline for submissions on 15 October 2021. Following this date, another call will be opened for papers, which the conference participants will submit to one of the sessions. The deadline for the call for papers will be 31 March 2022.

Nubian studies are multidisciplinary and require diverse forms of scholarly interaction. If a workshop or roundtable is a
more suitable way to interact in your discipline or research area, please feel free to organize such a meeting during the conference. For assistance, please contact the Organising Committee at [email protected] with your idea for a workshop or roundtable before 15 October 2021. Basic information and detailed instructions on how to submit your proposal for a session, workshop or roundtable can be accessed following the link https://nubianstudies2022.uw.edu.pl/registration1/.


Timetable for calls:
23 July 2021 – 15 October 2021: call for sessions, workshops and roundtables
1 November 2021 – 31 March 2022: call for papers

Community Heritage for Education Sustainability in Tanzania [CHEST] project

The Community Heritage for Education Sustainability in Tanzania [CHEST] project, with P.I. Paul Lane, has a team of heritage educators working in Pangani, Tanzania over the next 3 weeks, building on work initiated during the AHRC-funded CONCH project https://www.conchproject.org/.

Site-specific education material has been created and developed by ArchaeoLink in collaboration with the Archaeology and Education departments of the University of Dar es Salaam [UDSM] and 7 schools in the area.

The material is based on the archaeology, history and cultural heritage of the area and includes a game to assist in the development of critical thinking skills in children. Accompanied by a group of student teachers from UDSM the material will be delivered, through induction sessions at each school and at the Cultural Centre in Pangani.

You are welcome to see progress and participate through comments by
following:
on Twitter @ArchaeoLink
or
on Instagram @Images.ArchaeoLink

CHEST has received grants from Research England GCRF QR Fund and the University of Cambridge Arts and Humanities Impact Fund.

The Mohamed Ali Foundation Fellowship programme

The fellowship programme is based at Durham University and managed by an international Advisory Panel comprising academic subject specialists. The programme began in 2019 with the residency of the first fellow Dr Pascale Ghazaleh of the American University in Cairo: her inaugural lecture is now  available online. More fellowships will be awarded over the next 5 years. An Advisory Panel, chaired by  Professor Anoush Ehteshami, Director of the  Institute for Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies, will appoint one or two fellows each year.

Fellows will be early career (post-doctoral) or established scholars. The nature of the collection will often require good reading knowledge of Arabic, Ottoman Turkish, French, and English. The  online catalogue of the collection indicates the languages of each file of material.

The Fellowship, tenable jointly in IMEIS and Grey College, entitles the holder to full access during their residency to departmental and other University facilities such as Computing and Information Services and the University Library. Accommodation is provided at Durham during the Epiphany term (January-March), but there is flexibility to arrange residencies in different terms to suit fellows’ availability, and fellows may be permitted to reside in Cairo or Istanbul for the duration of the fellowship where digitised copies of the archive have been deposited. All fellows will visit Durham, if only briefly, in order to deliver their lecture. Lectures and other activities elsewhere during the fellowship will be encouraged.

Fellows who do reside at Durham will also be encouraged to take a full part in academic and collegiate life, delivering the already mentioned lecture and perhaps also contributing to seminars.

Fellows will be awarded an honorarium upon completion of their fellowship, and accommodation and all meals will be provided for the duration of the fellowship; a research travel grant is also available to each fellow.

Applicants are advised to familiarise themselves with the  online catalogue of the Abbas Hilmi II Papers, or the collection itself, and to review the full  Call for Applications and the Chapter Outline of the edited volume that is provided. More detailed information on the fellowship programme is also provided with the Call.

This call is now open, and applications should be submitted by 30 September 2019, preferably by email, to the Mohamed Ali Foundation Fellowship Programme at the address provided. Applicants should include a CV (of no more than 2 pages), a two to three-page outline of their proposed research and contact details for two referees, and send this information to:

The Secretary

The Mohamed Ali Foundation Fellowship Programme

Durham University Library

Palace Green

Durham DH1 3RN

United Kingdom

Email: [email protected]

New Regimes of Recognition and Distribution?: Identity Politics in Post-2010 Kenya

Symposium Call for Contributions

Wednesday 6 and Thursday 7 November 2019, British Institute in Eastern Africa, Nairobi

This symposium seeks to bring academic, government, civil society and community groups into conversation with each-other about emerging dynamics of recognition and distribution in Kenya. We will explore questions such as:

  • What do ‘recognition’ and ‘distribution’ mean to minority and marginalised groups and communities?
  • What kinds of identity categories provide a useful basis for making claims on the state? Why these categories?
  • What forms of recognition are significant in Kenya today? What are the processes for claiming recognition? What are the consequences or implications of being recognised, or not recognised?
  • How are the state’s resources being distributed under devolution (in theory and in practice)?
  • What are the major sites of conflict, disagreement or contestation around recognition and distribution? How are different identity groups engaging in these contests?
  • What is the link between recognition and distribution?
  • What challenges lie ahead for achieving justice and equality in recognition and distribution?
  • What is the role of the various government commissions (e.g. National Cohesion and Integration Commission, National Gender and Equality Commission and so on) in responding to these challenges?
  • What is the role of civil society groups in responding to these challenges?
  • To what extent can academic theories around the politics of recognition help us make sense of contemporary dynamics in Kenya? What other theories can advance our thinking?

Want to participate?

If you would like to take part in this symposium, please complete the Expression of Interest form HERE and email it to [email protected] or WhatsApp a photo to +61 456 013 906.

More on how to Apply, click here

Home Office Visa service discriminating against Africans

“Home Office data on visa refusals shows that African applicants are more than twice as likely to be refused a UK visa than applicants from any other part of the world.  The UK has good relations with most African countries, but it needs to be recognised that no single issue does more damage to the image or influence of the UK in Africa than this visa question.”

After 6 months of evidence gathering, a parliamentary report, published on 16th July by the All-Party Parliamentary Groups (APPG) for Africa, for Malawi and for Diaspora, Development and Migration found the UK visit visa system was not currently fit for purpose, being inaccessible to many Africans, under resourced, unaccountable and widely perceived as biased or even discriminating against Africans.

The report identifies several specific challenges faced by Africans in applying for visas to the UK, including;

  • A centralised application system that requires many applicants to travel hundreds, even thousands of miles simply to apply for a visa.
  • Weak quality control and lack of oversight leading to erroneous, careless and sometimes offensive decisions.
  • Perceived lack of procedural fairness: in many cases additional documentation and evidence is requested over and above that specified in the guidelines, but even then some decisions seem to be arbitrary and illogical.
  • Financial discrimination in decision-making:  many applications are rejected because the applicant has little money, even though all costs have been guaranteed by a sponsoring third party.
  • No right of appeal, requiring expensive re-application to correct a mistaken decision.

Chi Onwurah MP, Chair of the APPG for Africa states: “at a time when the UK needs to be ‘open for business’, the broken visas system is doing severe damage to UK-Africa relations across a variety of sectors. As well as our relations, it damages our economy and society. It is embarrassing, patronising and insulting to African applicants and leaves the slogan of “Global Britain” empty and meaningless.”

The report identifies the real costs to British business, academia, arts and culture from the current dysfunctional system, and puts forward a series of achievable recommendations to UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) to help them respond to concerns raised by the findings. These include the following:

  1. Expedited application processes for those applicants who currently have to travel to a neighbouring country to apply and/or be interviewed for a visa.
  2. Clearer information to visa applicants on visa application processes and requirements, especially in terms of supporting documents that must be submitted by the applicant.
  3. Where decision-making is fully digitized, ensure documents are scanned in the country of application.
  4. Opening more Visa Application Centres (VACs) in countries where they are not currently sited.

An embargoed copy of the report is available online  here.

For more information please contact Henrietta Bailey on [email protected]

Available: The 2017 Elections Special Issue of the Journal of Eastern African Studies

ABSTRACT

This article asks what Kenya’s 2017 general elections tell us about the capacity of a new constitution to reduce the stakes of political competition and prospects of political instability. Three constitutional changes are particularly important: the adoption of a 50% + 1 threshold for the presidential election; the devolution of power to 47 county governments; and the introduction of a Supreme Court with the right to hear presidential electoral petitions. We find that the impact of the 2010 constitution has been mixed. The 50% plus 1 threshold encouraged coalition formation, but this dynamic has long been evident. Devolution has given a wider set of Kenyans a stake in the system, but has also created new structures that can be used to channel dissent against state. The Supreme Court demonstrated its capacity to as an independent institution, but did little to sustain electoral legitimacy. Indeed, while the 2010 constitution has clearly reshaped the political landscape, it was a personal deal that ended the post- election impasse. The elections therefore demonstrate how formal institutions alone cannot change political logics and reveal the continued significance of individual politicians and informal institutions that may compete with or complement their formal counterparts.

Has Kenya changed? The 2017elections and the impact of constitutional reform.

Articles

  • Kenya’s 2017 elections: winner-takes-all politics as usual?, Nic Cheeseman, Karuti Kanyinga, Gabrielle Lynch, Mutuma Ruteere and Justin Willis
  • Judicialisation of politics and Kenya’s 2017 elections, Karuti Kanyinga and Collins Odote
  • Violence, security and the policing of Kenya’s 2017 elections, Patrick Mutahi and Mutuma Ruteere
  • Treacherous coattails: gubernatorial endorsements and the presidential race in Kenya’s 2017 election, Elena Gadjanova
  • Intensified local grievances, enduring national control: the politics of land in the 2017Kenyan elections, Michelle D’Arcy and Marina Nistotskaya
  • Women’s political inclusion in Kenya’s devolved political system, Yolande Bouka, Marie E. Berry and Marilyn Muthoni Kamuru
  • Support or subvert? Assessing devolution’s effect on central power during Kenya’s 2017 presidential rerun, Hannah Waddilove
  • The Buffalo and the Squirrel: moral authority and the linitsof patronage in Kiambu County’s 2017 gubernatorial race, Peter Lockwood

Available Here

 

1st Call For Applications: BIEA Thematic Research Grants

Every year the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) invites applications for our small Thematic Research Grants. These funds are usually dispersed through two calls for applications per year, usually released in June/July and December. This is the first call for applications in the 2019-2020 year. Please pay attention to this webpage in December 2019 for the second 2019/20 grant call deadline information.

The British Institute in Eastern Africa invites applications for funding for research projects that engage with one or more of the following thematic areas:

  1. Citizens and Science in Eastern Africa
  2. Migrations and Mobilities
  3. Everyday States
  4. Land, Heritage ad Memory
  5. Spending Time

BIEA research funding is available to support original research within these thematic areas in any discipline in the humanities and social sciences across the region. The BIEA’s thematic grant scheme particularly seeks to help researchers who have limited access to other sources of funds. In doing so, the BIEA seeks to nurture early career researchers and scholars in eastern Africa, and is keen to fund small projects that lay the ground for larger projects.  Such researchers may include postgraduate students in eastern African or the UK, or people who have not followed conventional research careers but whose local knowledge or contacts make them well-fitted to conduct quality research.

This funding supports original research in the humanities and social sciences, and we particularly encourage applications from the wider eastern African region, which we define as stretching from Sudan, to Mozambique, and including Madagascar. Grants are normally between £500 and £1,000; in exceptional circumstances, up to £1,500 may be awarded. The grant should contribute towards actual research costs and not include institutional overheads, equipment, and applicant’s stipend or publication costs. Priority is given to researchers based in the UK or eastern Africa.

All applications and references must be submitted by email to  [email protected]  by 15th of July 2019.

Late applications will not be considered. Please Complete the Application Form (downloadable here).

BIEA’s research funding is competitive, and we can only fund a limited number of applicants. Your application must make a clear and compelling case for why we should support your proposed research. It is a condition for the investigator to provide BIEA with written documentation that the research has been approved through ethical review prior to receiving the grant. Applications should include:

  • a covering letter making your case for a grant and explaining the background to your project;
  • a CV;
  • a completed application form;
  • a detailed proposal (maximum 1500 words) setting out how the project fits into the thematic area;
  • a clear and realistic budget detailing how you will use the amount requested;
  • a plan for dissemination – PhD thesis, journal article, conference papers, etc (BIEA will not fund research if there is no prospect that anyone will ever hear about the results).

You will need to arrange for a reference to be sent directly to BIEA by the closing date. The referee must support you and endorse the project in your application. For postgraduate students, your referee must be your supervisor.

Successful applicants will be informed within one month of the closing date. If you have not heard from us by then, please assume that your application has not been successful on this occasion.

If you are successful in your grant application, you must be a member of the BIEA to receive your award.

For more information on the grants, see  guidelines for applying.